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Wes Bos

Wes Bos

Full Stack JavaScript Developer. Creator of really good web development courses. BBQ enthusiast.

Scott Tolinski

Scott Tolinski

Web Developer, Creator of Level Up Tuts, Bboy, Robotops Crew and Youtuber

Playing: 112: The Freelance Client Lifecycle - Part 1

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Jan 23rd, 2019

The Freelance Client Lifecycle - Part 1

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In this episode Scott and Wes talk about the freelance client lifecycle—from gathering requirements, to project hand-off, and everything in between.

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Show Notes

03:29 - Gathering Requirements

  • Probably the most important part of the process. If you botch this, you'll be dealing with change orders and scope-creep throughout the entire project. Poor planning is why agencies have project managers and why many freelancers hate their clients.
  • Ask lots of questions
  • Get lots of examples
  • Break down each page into functionality
  • Ask about budget
  • Clarify who will be updating the site
  • Do this in person if possible

17:00 - Quote

  • Figuring out the quote
  • Break it down into major functional areas that don't necessarily depend on each other.
  • Multi-staged quotes are great because if it's too expensive, the client knows they can add additional features later in the project.
  • Explain the tech you will use in relation to how it will help their business, or how easy it will be for them to manage.
  • Presenting the quote
    • List what will be included
    • List what won't be included
    • Make your quote valid for two weeks
    • Create a template that looks professional
      • Our agency had a professional template, printed on heavy paper in an embossed folder with our logo on it.
    • You don't have to go this far, but experience matters. Think Apple. You can quote more if you have a higher perception of quality.

30:20 - Timelines

  • Timelines should include hard dates. You should have a "hard on" and and "hard off".
  • Assume 24-hour turnaround on questions
  • Be generous with your estimates. Under promise, over deliver.
  • Quoting time is a huge skill

35:58 - Contract

  • You best have one
  • Spell out what the client is getting (from quote)
  • At the very least, have the client sign your quote
  • Clear communication and a good relationship is extremely important
  • Use online templates, or have a lawyer create something specific

41:09 - Setting Expectations

  • Don't make yourself available 24/7
  • Establish a professional environment by not being too casual
  • Your choices will set the course for your relationship
  • Don't be too quick to reply to email
  • Schedule emails for 10a.m.

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